The Power of Perspectives

The Canadian Bar Association
Blog

Federal government settles civil suit launched by Omar Khadr

By Mariane Gravelle July 7, 2017 7 July 2017

In a midday press conference on Friday, the federal government publicly acknowledged that it had reached a settlement in a civil suit launched against it by former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr.

While details of this settlement remain confidential, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould stated that that it included a written apology that will soon be put on public record.

Mr. Goodale explained that neither the civil case nor the ensuing settlement were about Mr. Khadr’s actions in Afghanistan. Rather, this case examined the question of whether the behaviour of Canadian officials towards Mr. Khadr during his imprisonment violated his rights as a Canadian citizen.

Read More
The Practice

Got stress? What to do before the burnout hits

By Ann Macaulay July 7, 2017 7 July 2017

Got stress? What to do before the burnout hits

 

Many young lawyers struggle with high levels of stress and often leave the practice of law altogether because of it. Conflict, long hours, demanding clients, competition and the constant pressure to be perfect can be stressful for even the toughest, most experienced lawyers.

Fortunately, there are many ways to cope before burnout hits. Most people typically start with the basics to fight stress: exercise, eat and sleep properly, take vacations, meditate, practise mindfulness and don’t isolate yourself from others. But there’s even more that can be done.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help, says Gary Mitchell, CEO and founder of On Trac Coach in Vancouver. “Don’t try and do it on your own. You may think you’re the smartest person in the room but often you’re not because other people have other skills. Surround yourself with those other people.”

Read More
CBA Community: Young Lawyers International Program

Finding a calling far from home

By Beverley Spencer July 6, 2017 6 July 2017

Finding a calling far from home


Persia Sayyari’s path to the BC Coroners’ Service took her via Constitution Hill, a former prison in Johannesburg where men and women who fought apartheid were once incarcerated.

Home to South Africa’s Constitutional Court and the offices of the South African History Archive (SAHA), it’s where she worked as an intern with the Young Lawyers International Program in 2012-13. Her experience there shaped her decision to pursue a career with an investigative role – as a coroner who conducts preliminary investigations of unnatural, unexpected or unexplained deaths.

It’s a long way from SAHA, an independent human rights archive that preserves histories about struggles for social justice and uses access to information laws to support present-day activism.  But the work was an eye-opener for someone who, as an articling student, had been frustrated with how the human elements of a case can be ignored during litigation.

Read More
The Practice

Sitting on a board can improve your professional footing

By Carolynne Burkholder-James July 6, 2017 6 July 2017

Sitting on a board can improve your professional footing

 

Volunteering as a board member can benefit both your community and your law career as well, according to Matthew Reid.

Reid is a personal injury lawyer with Cohen Highley LLP in London, Ont., who has extensive experience as a board member. Currently, he is a school trustee and chair of the Thames Valley District School Board and president and chair of the board at HOBY Canada, a youth leadership program. Reid has also been a board member with Regional HIV/AIDS Connection and several other organizations.

Reid says he encourages young lawyers to volunteer their services as a board member. 

Read More

North Korea and the legality of nuclear tests

By Mariane Gravelle July 5, 2017 5 July 2017

North Korea and the legality of nuclear tests

A large number of sanctions imposed on their nation as a result of previous missile-launch tests does not seem to have deterred the North Korean government from engaging in yet another test of that nature. On July 4th, Pyongyang launched what they claimed to be an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) into the waters bordering Japan. Especially concerning is the fact this latest missile – if fired on the right trajectory – could potentially reach Alaska.

Read More
Administrative law

Paul Daly on getting lost in description

By Yves Faguy July 4, 2017 4 July 2017

Paul Daly on getting lost in description

 

In the latest volume of the Canadian Bar Review, which examines the legacy of the former Supreme Court Justice Louis LeBel, Paul Daly explores the limits of language in administrative law, and LeBel’s role in clarifying our understanding of judicial review.  CBA National sat down with the senior lecturer in public law at the University of Cambridge to ask him about why descriptive language in law can be more of burden than help.

CBA National: Why is administrative law such a difficult subject?

Paul Daly: Administrative law is tricky because it is a body of general principles that exist in the abstract and then they have to be applied to different substantive areas of law, which is a challenge. So, you have to apply it to employment law, environmental law, energy law, municipal law, immigration law, a whole host of areas which they themselves have very detailed rules and regulations. Already that gives you a degree of complexity. Then add to this the fact that principles of administrative law are quite recent and the area has undergone a radical reformulation in the last 50 years. And in Canada it's even more complicated because in trying to work through the general principles of administrative law, the Supreme Court of Canada made numerous U-turns and has created a body of case law that is difficult to navigate.

N: So what do you mean when you say that administrative jurists must appreciate the limits of language in reaching more accurate decisions?

Read More
Corporate counsel

Capturing Your “Innerpreneur”

By Jim Middlemiss July 4, 2017 4 July 2017

Capturing Your “Innerpreneur”

 

Sébastien Guénette had a crash course on how to think like an entrepreneur, and the Director, Legal at the Canadian operations of Japan Tobacco International (JTI) says he’s a better in-house lawyer because of it.

“Being in the shoes of an entrepreneur for a week and taking your legal hat off was a very good exercise,” Guénette says of a course that his company’s legal department put on in Madrid for 80 of its senior in-house lawyers two years ago.

One of the big benefits for him was learning to “take the risk to make decisions, even if the data is not entirely complete, which business people often do, but it is very counter-intuitive for a lawyer to do that.”

Read More
CBA influence

Immigration Detention Framework: Let the children go

By Kim Covert June 30, 2017 30 June 2017

 

The CBA response to consultations on the Canadian Border Services Agency’s new National Immigration Detention Framework touches on four concerns – particularly the question of detaining children.

Whatever the status of the child, whether he or she is an unaccompanied minor, or a Canadian citizen with parents being held in detention, the overriding rule of thumb should always be to keep the best interests of the child in the forefront. And it is never in the best interests of a child to be detained, say the CBA National Immigration Section and the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Community Forum in their submission.

Read More
Corporate counsel

The Future is Now: Innovations in the Legal Industry

By Pablo Fuchs June 30, 2017 30 June 2017

The Future is Now: Innovations in the Legal Industry

 

As organizations demand more from their legal teams, in-house counsel can look to innovative technologies to help them become more productive. Many of these tools focus on removing menial, time-consuming work so counsel can focus on higher-value judgment tasks and spend resources more effectively.

Here is a closer look at some up-and-coming Canadian companies that offer unique, productivity enhancing tools for in-house counsel.

Read More
Law and the internet

SCC rules against U.S. tech giants: “The internet has no borders”

By Justin Ling June 29, 2017 29 June 2017

SCC rules against U.S. tech giants: “The internet has no borders”

 

It’s been a bad week for two internet giants.

Both Facebook and Google lost landmark decisions at the Supreme Court of Canada over the last few days, with the top court ruling against Google in a case involving de-indexing websites, and against Facebook in a case about forum selection.

The pair of rulings signals a move to establish that just because these tech giants are headquartered in California — or elsewhere — it doesn’t mean they can wiggle out from under Canadian legal jurisdiction.

Read More
CBA Influence

Trans inmates: It’s all about respect

By Kim Covert June 29, 2017 29 June 2017

 

Historically, trans inmates are penalized not only for their criminal behaviour but, because Canadian jails and prisons – and the policies that govern them – weren’t designed to accommodate non-binary prisoners, they’re also punished for asserting a gender other than that assigned at birth.

Correctional Service Canada is reviewing its policies relating to gender identity and expression and the CBA’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Community Forum, along with the CBA Criminal Justice Section, made a submission in June to respond to CSC’s proposed policy amendments.

Read More
National security

Super agency proposed to oversee national security

By Justin Ling June 29, 2017 29 June 2017


Canada’s national security regime will soon see the largest overhaul in its review, management, and approval structure since the McDonald Commission recommended splitting the RCMP’s intelligence branch off into a new agency: CSIS.

The Trudeau government legislation, C-59, addresses a number of facets in Canada’s national security infrastructure — National wrote about its plans for CSIS’s disruption powers last week — but the changes to how Canada’s national security framework is managed and monitored are almost certainly the most far-reaching.

Under the proposed legislation, Canada’s national security agencies will be under the purview of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, or NSIRA. That body essentially looks like the ‘Super SIRC,’ the proposed agency that would expand the scope of the CSIS review body to include a variety of other agencies.

Read More

Current Issue

Editor's Picks

Google's US court challenge to SCC "repugnant" order

Editor's Picks

Closing tax loopholes for professionals who incorporate

Editor's Picks

Copyright fees at York: Federal Court rejects fair dealing

National TV

  • Thumb

    CBA's intervention in Lloyd v. R

  • Thumb

    Margaret Hagan on the role law schools can play in fostering innovation

  • Thumb

    Melina Buckley on the importance of legal aid benchmarks in Canada

View All Videos

Partners In Your Success