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CBA Futures

Legal futures round-up: April 12, 2017

By Brandon Hastings April 12, 2017 12 April 2017

Legal futures round-up: April 12, 2017

 

Inspired by the CBA Legal Futures report on Transforming the Delivery of Legal Services in Canada, here’s our regular round-up of noteworthy developments, opinions and news in the legal futures space as a means of furthering discussion about our changing legal marketplace.

First, a glance at what’s happening across the pond. Five years after obtaining its ABS licence, among the first in England, and a difficult start, Co-operative Legal Services is now making real profits.

Signalling a possible trend toward outsourcing in-house legal services, PwC has recently snapped up half of GE’s tax department – including 600 of its lawyers -- as part of a five-year deal to provide tax services to the conglomerate.

Also supporting the trend, international law firm Pinsent Masons has taken a 20 per cent stake in New Law start-up Yuzu.

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Anti-corruption

Helping companies steer clear of corruption

By Michael Dempster April 11, 2017 11 April 2017

Helping companies steer clear of corruption


Alexandra Wrage receives more than a few calls from nervous CEOs these days.

They’re worried about dinner invitations to foreign officials. They’ve budgeted $200 for a meal—but when a large entourage arrives and orders expensive wines, the bill climbs to $1,000 or more. They want to know: Are we guilty of corruption? Bribery?

These dinner dates aren’t like handing over briefcases filled with money. But it’s an issue, Wrage says, that will keep executives up at night worrying about the consequences of possible wrongdoing.

How times have changed since November 2001, when Wrage founded TRACE International Inc. with the goal of making it easier and less expensive for companies to avoid corruption.

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CBA influence

CBA welcomes diversity measures in Bill C-25

By Kim Covert April 11, 2017 11 April 2017


Changes to the Canada Business Corporations Act designed to make certain enterprises more accountable for diversity in corporate leadership get a thumbs-up from a number of CBA groups.

The Canadian Corporate Counsel Association, the Women Lawyers Forum, the Business, Charities and Not-for-Profit and Competition sections and the Equality Committee collaborated on a submission responding to Bill C-25, which proposes amendments to the Canada Business Corporations Act, the Canada Cooperatives Act, the Canada Not-for-Profit Corporations Act and the Competition Act.

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CBA Submission

Suzanne Morin on the enforcement of meaningful consent under PIPEDA

By Mariane Gravelle April 10, 2017 10 April 2017

Suzanne Morin on the enforcement of meaningful consent under PIPEDA


Last month, the CBA made a submission commenting on the parliamentary review of PIPEDA. Suzanne Morin, the Vice-Chair of the CBA National Privacy and Access Section, represented the CBA.

CBA National: Broadly, what is the CBA’s position on this issue?

Suzanne Morin: The CBA Sections have made numerous submissions on PIPEDA since its enactment in 2001 and continue to support the existing consent and ombudsperson models in PIPEDA in the absence of a compelling need for legislative change. Within these existing models, however, a handful of targeted amendments are needed: first to the concept of publicly available information to ensure our PIPEDA framework remains technology neutral, and second to allow the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) to issue non-binding advance opinions.

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Criminal law

Countdown to 2018: Why the courts might not allow prosecutions for pot?

By Justin Ling April 10, 2017 10 April 2017

Countdown to 2018: Why the courts might not allow prosecutions for pot?

 

Justin Trudeau’s plan to legalize marijuana is coming down the pipes, as soon as this week.

You could be forgiven for wondering what, exactly, took the prime minister so long — he’s had a set of clear recommendations since December — but, if reports are to be believed, it will be more than a year before the actual legislation comes into force.

That leaves Canada with more than 12 months before the arrests and prosecutions of marijuana users and dealers comes to an end. Stuck, in other words, with a system that “does not work,” according to Trudeau’s own campaign document: A system which “does not prevent young people from using marijuana and too many Canadians end up with criminal records for possessing small amounts of the drug.”

So the question now is: Will the courts allow it?

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International law

Was the U.S. strike against Syria legal under international law?

By Yves Faguy April 10, 2017 10 April 2017

Was the U.S. strike against Syria legal under international law?


Noting that U.S. President Trump can invoke no clear authority in international law to use force in response to Syria’s use of chemical weapons, John Bellinger argues that he needs to justify his actions legally all the same:

Although a U.S. military strike cannot be easily justified as self-defense of the United States, it is possible that the United States could argue that the use of force was permissible as an action in collective self-defense of Syria’s neighbors.  Alternatively, it might be better for the Trump Administration to argue that its limited use of force was justified, even if not strictly lawful, under international law based on the specific facts in Syria and that other avenues had been exhausted.   This is the approach the Clinton Administration took when it participated in the NATO bombing campaign in Kosovo in the 1990s, and that the Obama Administration was apparently prepared to take if it had decided to use force against Syria in 2013.

But for Craig Forcese, there are no persuasive legal arguments to be articulated, notably around exceptions of  “humanitarian intervention” or the “responsibility to protect”:

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Constitutional

Who’s a parent? A Nova Scotia adoption case with constitutional implications

By Jennifer Taylor April 7, 2017 7 April 2017

Who’s a parent? A Nova Scotia adoption case with constitutional implications

 

Can a court issue a notice of constitutional question on its own motion?

That question is currently before the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal in an adoption case that has implications for women’s reproductive choices.

The court heard an appeal on March 30, 2017 from the decision of a Supreme Court Family Division judge to address whether a biological father – unidentified in the case at hand – has the constitutional right to be notified of an application to put a child up for adoption. Background information is reported in an earlier decision, but identifying details are subject to a publication ban under the province’s Children and Family Services Act.

Under that law, a biological mother signed an agreement with the Minister of Community Services to put her child up for adoption. The prospective adoptive parents then filed a Notice of Proposed Adoption. This is a routine proceeding, and all involved likely expected the court to issue the adoption order without question. It didn’t turn out that way. The court was concerned that the biological father was not involved.

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Transportation

Rules of the road: How are we going to regulate autonomous cars?

By Agnese Smith April 7, 2017 7 April 2017

Rules of the road: How are we going to regulate autonomous cars?


Canadian regulators pondering the possibility of a truly autonomous car future must grapple with two alternate realities — one where the necessary technology is right around the corner and the other where it’s way down the road. Either way, the question is how safe is safe enough, and at what cost?

Car makers like BMW and Ford are unsurprisingly in the former camp, announcing plans to deliver fully automated vehicles (AV), with Level 5 capabilities – or full automation – within the next five years. Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted in January its cars will have that in “3 months maybe, 6 months definitely.” Uber, Google and other technology firms are also investing billions in this space. Self-driving advocates point not only to the potential profits, but also the life-saving and environmental benefits this technology could eventually bring.  

But many in the artificial intelligence and engineering community are skeptical about this timeline. They say the technology for AVs to drive in mixed traffic — presumably, without chaos — are still many years away. For all the teeth-gnashing and shirt-rending angst about how AI might eventually kill off the human race, right now it can’t even drive to a suburban mall, let alone handle junctions like Paris’ Etoile, the intersection of Lake Shore Boulevard and Lower Jarvis St in Toronto or pretty much anywhere in Italy.

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CBA influence

Technology-neutral PIPEDA’s consent model has aged well; Regulations have not

By Kim Covert April 7, 2017 7 April 2017


If it ain’t broke…

That’s essentially what the CBA told the Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics Committee in March about the existing consent model in PIPEDA – the Personal Information and Protection of Electronic Documents Act that was enacted in 2001.

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CBA influence

Bill C-23: This strip of my country is your country

By Kim Covert April 6, 2017 6 April 2017

Bill C-23: This strip of my country is your country

 

What do you do with a bill to implement an agreement reached by governments in two countries that have each been replaced by administrations with very different priorities and ideologies?

When it comes to Bill C-23, which would implement the Agreement on Land, Rail, Marine and Air Transport Preclearance reached between Canada under Stephen Harper’s Conservatives and the U.S. under Barack Obama’s Democrats, a number of national CBA Sections suggest you step back – waaaaay back – and think hard about what the legislation would mean once enacted.

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Money-laundering

Who’s in Control? Unmasking the beneficial owners of companies

By Noah Arshinoff April 6, 2017 6 April 2017

Who’s in Control? Unmasking the beneficial owners of companies

 

They’ve been called the “puppet masters” by the World Bank. Indeed, the Panama Papers shed light on how beneficial owners, or the real people who own/control companies, sometimes go to great lengths to keep their identities hidden. And according to Transparency International, Canada’s opaque laws on beneficial ownership make it an ideal breeding ground for tax evaders and money launderers.

Canadian law permits the use of nominees—essentially custodians—for directors and shareholders, thereby masking the beneficial owners of a company. For in-house counsel, navigating this environment can be complex, especially within a company’s due diligence program.

Why it matters

According to the World Bank, anonymous companies are the most common way US$1-$2 trillion are lost to money laundering each year. They are also used to finance terrorist activities and line the pockets of drug traffickers and corrupt politicians. While no company means to aid those with illicit intentions, the absence of any sort of national registry of beneficial ownership can make it very difficult to determine who you are actually doing business with.

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CBA influence

CBA groups urge repeal of Criminal Code section 159 at ‘earliest opportunity’

By Kim Covert April 6, 2017 6 April 2017


It used to be that when the Criminal Code talked about sex, it talked about sexual acts – and it made a whole host of them illegal – particularly if they were associated with homosexuality. But in the 1980s, a more open-minded wind blew through the Code, bringing with it the idea that the specific acts should be less of a focus than the age of the people performing them and their capacity to consent to them.

As it currently stands, the age of consent is 16, and 16-year-olds can consent to any form of sexual activity that it pleases them to engage in – except one.

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