Yves Faguy

CBA Futures

Friday weekly wrap-up

Par Yves Faguy août 10, 2018 10 août 2018

Friday weekly wrap-up

 

Here’s a quick look at some the top legal affairs stories from the past week in our Friday Wrap-Up.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s announced $25M in funding for “legal swat teams” at provincial courthouses to fight gun violence in Toronto.  Citing Chicago's handgun ban as proof they don't work, Ford also dismissed calls for a ban on the sale of handguns in Toronto. In fact, the handgun ownership ban is no longer in effect in the Windy City. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional in 2010. Meanwhile, Evan Dyer points out that Canada needs much better data on where crime guns are coming from.

Beginning in September, Quebec’s Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI) will investigate all criminal allegations against police officers members of a First Nation or the Inuit nation. The BEI also announced its intention to recruit, as soon as possible, one or more First Nations and Inuit Investigators for greater representation within their organization.

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CBA Futures

Legal futures round-up

Par Yves Faguy août 8, 2018 8 août 2018

Legal futures round-up

 

Time for a quick round-up of notable trends and developments and views that highlight innovation in the legal industry.

The big news was the recent announcement that Big Four accountancy EY will acquire Riverview, a leader in the managed legal services space since its launch in 2012 with the backing of global law firm DLA Piper. Legal Business reports that DLA Piper is selling its interest in Riverview, though it retains a small stake in Kim Technologies, an AI platform that Riverview acquired in 2015 (but from which it has since demerged). The acquired entity will be known as EY Riverview Law once the deal is completed (possibly by the end of the month).

Liam Brown notes the obvious – that the move “reflects the growing ambitions of the Big 4 in law” – but also that “Riverview’s action reflects that making a dent in the legal market is hard yards.” He also cautions that we recently witnessed a similar move when Conduit Law partnered up with Deloitte in 2016, only to end their affiliation 18 months later.

The Ontario Bar Association is launching a first “Innovator in Residence” program that aims to identify, develop and advance innovations that will help members better serve their clients.  Peter Aprile, a tax litigator and founder of Counter Tax Lawyers, will be the first Innovator in Residence as of September.

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Famille

Réforme de la loi sur les mères porteuses: Pistes de solution pour le Québec

Par Yves Faguy août 7, 2018 7 août 2018

Réforme de la loi sur les mères porteuses: Pistes de solution pour le Québec

Bien que la maternité de substitution ne soit pas interdite au Canada, les contrats de mères porteuses sont généralement jugés inapplicables. Au Québec, « toute convention par laquelle une femme s’engage à procréer ou à porter un enfant pour le compte d’autrui est nulle de nullité absolue », en vertu de l'article 541 du Code civil, et donc contraire à l'ordre public. Dans un article récemment publié dans la Revue du Barreau canadien, Stefanie Carsley, de l’Université McGill, constate que les interdits n’ont pas eu l’effet dissuasif voulu par le législateur. Ente autre, les parents d’intention ont cherché à contourner la question de l'inapplicabilité en s'adressant aux tribunaux pour obtenir un statut juridique par le biais de l'adoption, plus particulièrement via l’adoption spéciale. Cela permet à un parent biologique de conserver son lien de filiation pendant que son conjoint adopte l'enfant. Carsley passe en revue la jurisprudence québécoise récente portant sur l'article 541 et conclut que le cadre juridique de la province fait défaut à toutes les parties. Elle étudie aussi l’histoire, les objectifs et les effets du traitement juridique actuel de la maternité de substitution par la province et examine les forces et les faiblesses des réformes proposées par le Comité consultatif sur le droit de la famille qui a formulé des recommandations en matière de gestation pour autrui qui placeraient les intérêts de l’enfant au cœur des obligations des parents d’intention et qui protégeraient mieux les mères porteuses. Elle propose que le gouvernement du Québec s’inspire aussi de la Family Law Act de la Colombie-Britannique et de la Loi portant réforme du droit de l’enfance de l’Ontario pour reconcevoir sa législation en matière de maternité de substitution.

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Indigenous law

Looking back at Latif and the challenge of proving discrimination

Par Yves Faguy juillet 13, 2018 13 juillet 2018

Looking back at Latif and the challenge of proving discrimination

 

This month marks the third anniversary of the Supreme Court of Canada ruling in which it rejected an appeal from Javed Latif, a Canadian pilot of Pakistani origin who claimed the transportation company Bombardier Inc. had discriminated against him on account of his ethnic background. Bombardier refused to provide him training at its facility in Quebec because U.S. authorities had declared him a threat to aviation security (Latif was also licensed in the U.S.). The Quebec Human Rights Tribunal agreed with Latif’s position, Quebec’s Court of Appeal set aside its decision because it could not find that Bombardier had discriminated against Latif without proof that the U.S. authorities’ decision was itself based on a ground that the Charter prohibits. In its ruling Supreme Court outlined the test for establishing discrimination in human rights cases.

In their recent article published in the current edition of the Canadian Bar Review, Colleen Sheppard and Mary Louise Chabot draw parallels with a very different decision, the SCC’s Taypotat ruling, that decided that minimum education requirements to run for Chief or Band Councillor in the Kahkewistahaw First Nation are not discriminatory under section 15 of the Charter. The authors argue that our courts need to be more sensitive to the evidentiary challenges facing plaintiffs in establishing discrimination:

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Investor-State disputes

A more perfect international investor court?

Par Yves Faguy juillet 9, 2018 9 juillet 2018

A more perfect international investor court? <p> Over the past few years, the European Commission (EC) has been pushing to replace the traditional arbitration framework for investor-state disputes (ISDS) with a new investment court system &ndash; or ICS &ndash;run by independent judges, bound by strict conflict-of-interest rules, and operating more transparently.&nbsp; It&rsquo;s precisely what Canada and the EU agreed to when they concluded their free trade agreement, CETA. The &nbsp;push is part of an effort to respond to criticism that the traditional ISDS model of using arbitral tribunals to solve disputes is overly favourable to foreign investors at the expense of states&rsquo; interests.&nbsp; What&rsquo;s more ISDS allows investors to challenge domestic regulations and policies before private arbitration courts that are mostly out of reach of regular litigants. CETA&rsquo;s investment court system also provides for an appellate body to review decisions. The hope here is that this will help produce more consistency in treaty interpretation.</p> <p> On these points, in an article to be published in <em>The</em> <em>University of Western Australia Law Review</em>, <a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3198430">Kyle Dickson-Smith looks</a> at how investor-state dispute claims in developed countries encroach on the work of domestic courts which, in turn, judge the appropriateness of the arbitral tribunal&rsquo;s findings:</p>

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