The Power of Perspectives

The Canadian Bar Association

Julie Sobowale

Corporate counsel

Crisis management in the social media age

By Julie Sobowale January 16, 2018 16 January 2018

Crisis management in the social media age

 

When a crisis hits, you want a calm person at the helm of your crisis management. That’s what Kelly Friedman learned early on in her career.

“If an injunction comes in, I’m the one who is calm in those situations,” says Friedman (pictured above), who is national counsel of BLG’s Discovery Services Group in Toronto, specializing in e-discovery, cybersecurity and privacy. “One partner once told me, ‘Thank you for your equanimity.’ I had to look up the word and it means even keel. The more nervous people get, the more calm I get. It’s a great tool as a litigator.”

Litigators aren’t the only ones who need a calm head. How an organization can weather a crisis is now largely based on who gets the information out first. With the rise of social media and the increasingly rapid news cycle, general counsel must be more prepared than ever to deal with the next crisis.

A situation can escalate quickly through social media. On September 7, Equifax revealed that 143 million Americans and 100,000 Canadians (later revised to 145.5 million and 8,000, respectively) had their data stolen as the result of a data breach. The story quickly became viral, with thousands of Twitter users tweeting under hashtag #Equifax. Within two days of the initial report, the Chief Information Officer and the Chief Security Officer retired and two class-action law suits were filed. Then, over the next couple of days, Equifax accidentally tweeted links to phishing websites (websites that mirror others, normally to steal information) to breach victims, causing further criticism and social media outrage. 

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Practice hub

Does your office need an ombudsperson?

By Julie Sobowale June 16, 2017 16 June 2017

Does your office need an ombudsperson?

 

Melanie Raymond vividly remembers her first impression of law firm culture as an articling student.

“I was surprised in my first encounters with fellow colleagues about how everybody was bragging about being overloaded with work,” says Raymond, a commissioner at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. “I was surprised how this was something that was seen as positive.”

Every workplace culture is different – and those differences can lead to conflict. In a diverse work environment, it’s easy to miscommunicate and a simple misunderstanding can quickly escalate into a full-blown fight. 

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Corporate counsel

Blockchain for in-house counsel

By Julie Sobowale June 16, 2017 16 June 2017

Blockchain for in-house counsel

 

Jillian Friedman fell into the Bitcoin world three years ago. After finishing her articles, she started taking notice of the cryptocurrency and began working with the Bitcoin Embassy in early 2014.

“I started reading a lot about Bitcoin and went down the rabbit hole,” says Friedman. “I’m not a libertarian but I was intrigued by the application of libertarian philosophy to a technology and economic system.”

Friedman quickly became an expert in blockchain and the National Bank of Canada took notice. The bank hired her in 2015 to focus on technology law. She believes blockchain will have a big effect in commerce.

“I’m far more involved in the business side of things,” says Friedman. “I’ve been working closely by tech people for two years. It makes my job to identify risks a lot easier. I learn how things work.”

Blockchain is the legal tech darling of the year. Beyond the hype, blockchain is revolutionary technology that could change how we interact with one another. From financial transactions to health records, blockchain promises to be the next major legal tech frontier.

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Digital communications

Netflix tax may be coming soon to Canada

By Julie Sobowale March 2, 2017 2 March 2017

Netflix tax may be coming soon to Canada

 

Are your Netflix and chill plans in danger? That’s what’s headlines have been saying in recent weeks with the federal government contemplating levying additional taxes on streaming services. While it’s unknown if and when a tax would be levied, the debate raises issues of digital media, Canadian content and tax reform.

The story of Netflix began in 1997 when the company was sending DVDs by mail to consumers. In 2007 the company launched its streaming services and in 2013 started to release its own original content. Netflix expanded into Canada in 2010 and is now operating in more than 190 countries. Even as other competitors move into the market – including Amazon Prime Video and Bell’s CraveTV – Netflix remains the leader in streaming services. This new market has created issues for Canada on how to deal with online content from foreign companies.

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Practice hub

Making the most of media attention

By Julie Sobowale September 27, 2016 27 September 2016

Making the most of media attention

Jason van Rassel has been the “approacher” in this scenario hundreds of times. The former Calgary Herald justice reporter is now the journalist-in-residence at the University of Calgary Faculty of Law, and teaches law students about a variety of media topics – from pitching stories to the media to managing crisis communications.

“Reporters and lawyers don’t do the same things, but both have respective roles in keeping a court open to the public,” says Rassel. “There should be a cooperative relationship.”

Lawyers shouldn’t be afraid of the spotlight, he adds: the media can be a great benefit to your clients and your practice.

To attract media coverage, consider your audience and the story you want to tell.

 

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